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CeVOX Technology

CeVOX Module for CeVOX Technology
cevox technology

CeVOX Technology

Continuous monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation

The CeVOX Technology uses the method of spectrophotometry

Visión general

ScvO2 offers quick reacting information on the patients haemodynamic status. ScvO2 is much more sensitive than blood pressure and heart frequency for detecting shock status of any origin.

General

ScvO2 monitoring facilitates early detection of:

  • Imbalance between oxygen supply and oxygen consumption [2]
  • State of shock of any origin [1]
  • Insufficient cardiac output (surrogate parameter) [3]

Advantages

  • Immediate recognition of insufficient tissue oxygenation [4], [5]
  • Access via standard CVC
  • Reduction of blood gas analysis [6]
  • Oxygen balance in real-time
  • Easy handling no in-vitro calibration required

Useful application in

Disposables

CeVOX Probe

  • Continuous fiberoptic oximetry
  • Comfortable application
  • Access via existing standard CVC
  • Easy placement
  • ScvO2 immediately available


CeVOX probes can be inserted in the distal lumen of 15, 20 or 30 cm CVCs that allow guide wires ≥ 0.032”.

Methodology

Spectrophotometry is the quantitative measurement of the reflection or transmission properties of a material as a function of wavelengths of light. The CeVOX technology is using this method to measure the oxygen saturation of the blood continuously. For this purpose a CeVOX probe with inbuilt fibre optics is inserted into a blood vessel, usually a central vein.

An optical module emits infrared light of specific wave lengths and transmits them through a fibre optic into the vessel. The light is reflected off the red blood cells and transmitted back through a separate fibre optic back into the optical module and analyzed by a sensor.

References

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Todas las referencias

  1. Rady MY et al. Resuscitation of the critically ill in the ED: responses of blood pressure, heart rate, shock index, central venous oxygen saturation, and lactate.
    Am J Emerg Med. 1996 Mar;14(2):218-25.
    DOI: 10.1016/s0735-6757(96)90136-9
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  2. Reinhart K et al. Continuous central venous and pulmonary artery oxygen saturation monitoring in the critically ill. Intensive Care Med (2004) 30:1572–1578.
    DOI: 10.1007/s00134-004-2337-y
    *Nature of the claim: General, not product specific.

  3. Müller T et al. Das Monitoring der zentralvenösen und gemischtvenösen Sauerstoffsättigung. Intensivmed 2003, 40:711–719.
    DOI 10.1007/s00390-003-0385-0
    *Nature of the claim: General, not product specific.

  4. Perz S et al. Low and ‘‘supranormal’’ central venous oxygen saturation and markers of tissue hypoxia in cardiac surgery patients: a prospective observational study. Intensive Care Med 2011; 37:52–59. DOI 10.1007/s00134-010-1980-8
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  5. Marx G, Reinhart K, Venous oximetry. Curr Opin Crit Care 2006; 12:263–268. DOI: 10.1097/01.ccx.0000224872.09077.dc
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device


  6. Bloos F et al. Costs of intermittent measurement of central venous oxygen saturations by blood gas analysis. Intensive Care Med 2009 Jul;35(7):1316-7.
    DOI 10.1007/s00134-009-1407-6
    *Nature of the claim: General, not product specific.

  7. Trzeciak S et al. A 1-Year Experience With Implementing Early Goal-Directed Therapy for Septic Shock in the Emergency Department. Chest 2006 Feb;129(2):225-32.
    DOI: 10.1378/chest.129.2.225
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  8. Rivers et al. Early goal-directed therapy in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. N Engl J Med 2001; Nov 8;345(19):1368-77. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa010307
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  9. Park JH et al. Prognostic Value of Central Venous Oxygen Saturation and Blood Lactate Levels Measured Simultaneously in the Same Patients with Severe Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Severe Sepsis. Lung 2014; Jun;192(3):435-40. doi: 10.1007/s00408-014-9564-y
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  10. Maddirala S, Khan A, Optimizing Hemodynamic Support in Septic Shock Using Central and Mixed Venous Oxygen Saturation. Crit Care Clin 2010 Apr; 26(2):323-333. DOI:10.1016/j.ccc.2009.12.006
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  11. Pope JV et al. Multicenter Study of Central Venous Oxygen Saturation (ScvO2) as a Predictor of Mortality in Patients With Sepsis. Ann Emerg Med 2010; Jan;55(1):40-46.e1. DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2009.08.014
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  12. Nguyen HB et al. Implementation of a bundle of quality indicators for the early management of severe sepsis and septic shock is associated with decreased mortality. Crit Care Med 2007; Apr;35(4):1105-12. DOI: 10.1097/01.CCM.0000259463.33848.3D
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  13. Kortgen A et al. Implementation of an evidence-based “standard operating procedure” and outcome in septic shock. Crit Care Med 2006; Apr;34(4):943-9. DOI: 10.1097/01.CCM.0000206112.32673.D4
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  14. Bauer P, Reinhart K, Bauer, M. Early goal-directed therapy and outcome in septic shock. J Intensive Care 2007: 14, 87-92.
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  15. Chin KM et al. Central venous blood oxygen saturation monitoring in patients with chronic pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with continuous IV epoprostenol: correlation with measurements of hemodynamics and plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels. Chest 2007 Sep;132(3):786-92. DOI: 10.1378/chest.07-0694
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  16. Ander DS et al. Undetected cardiogenic shock in patients with congestive heart failure presenting to the emergency department. Am J Cardiol. 1998 Oct 1;82(7):888-91. DOI: 10.1016/s0002-9149(98)00497-4
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  17. Rivers EP et al. The clinical implications of continuous central venous oxygen saturation during human CPR. Ann Emerg Med 1992; Sep;21(9):1094-101. DOI: 10.1016/s0196-0644(05)80650-x
    **Nature of the claim: Similar device

  18. Csontos C et al. Arterial thermodilution in burn patients suggests a more rapid fluid administration during early resuscitation. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2008; Jul;52(6):742-9. DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2008.01658.x
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  19. Isaza-Restrepo A et al. Low values of central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) during surgery and anastomotic leak of abdominal trauma patients. World J Emerg Surg 2017; Jun 19;12:28. doi: 10.1186/s13017-017-0139-0
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  20. Scalea TM et al. Central venous oxygen saturation: a useful clinical tool in trauma patients. J Trauma 1990; Dec;30(12):1539-43.
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  21. Mikor A et al. Continuous central venous oxygen saturation assisted intraoperative hemodynamic management during major abdominal surgery: a randomized, controlled trial. BMC Anesthesiol 2015; Jun 4;15:82. doi: 10.1186/s12871-015-0064-2
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  22. Gasparovic et al. Diagnostic accuracy of central venous saturation in estimating mixed venous saturation is proportional to cardiac performance among cardiac surgical patients. J Crit Care 2014; Oct;29(5):828-34.
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2014.04.012
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  23. Smetkin AA et al. Single transpulmonary thermodilution and continuous monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation during off-pump coronary surgery. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2009; Apr;53(4):505-14.
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2008.01855.x
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  24. Müller M et al. Continuous SvO2 measurement in infants undergoing congenital heart surgery--first clinical experiences with a new fiberoptic probe. Paediatr Anaesth. 2007 Jan;17(1):51-5. DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2006.02026.x
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  25. Jakob SM et al. Multicentre study on peri- and postoperative central venous oxygen saturation in high-risk surgical patients. Crit Care. 2006;10(6):R158.
    DOI: 10.1186/cc5094
    ***Nature of the claim: Own device

  26. Balzer F et al. High central venous saturation after cardiac surgery is associated with increased organ failure and long-term mortality: an observational cross-sectional study. Crit Care 2015; Apr 16;19:168. DOI: 10.1186/s13054-015-0889-6.
    ** Nature of the claim: Similar device

  27. Meguro M et al. Continuous monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation predicts postoperative liver dysfunction after liver resection. Surgery 2013; Aug;154(2):351-62. DOI: 10.1016/j.surg.2013.04.039
    ** Nature of the claim: Similar device

  28. Hu BY et al. Combined central venous oxygen saturation and lactate as markers of occult hypoperfusion and outcome following cardiac surgery. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2012; Feb;26(1):52-7. DOI: 10.1053/j.jvca.2011.07.021
    ** Nature of the claim: Similar device

  29. Nogueira PM et al. Central venous saturation: a prognostic tool in cardiac surgery patients. J Intensive Care Med 2010; Mar-Apr;25(2):111-6.
    DOI: 10.1177/0885066609355398
    ** Nature of the claim: Similar device

  30. Pearse R et al. Changes in central venous saturation after major surgery, and association with outcome. Crit Care. 2005;9(6):R694-9.
    DOI: 10.1186/cc3888 ** Nature of the claim: Similar device