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Dr Torben Andersen, Vejle Hospital, wide angle

How to keep your patients less sedated during mechanical ventilation

with Dr Torben Andersen, Vejle Hospital

"We are able to communicate with our patients at almost any time", says Dr Andersen.

The key to having less sedated and actively participating patients is to be able to meet their breathing needs. To try and sustain their natural breathing effort as much as possible.

This is when monitoring the electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi), has become especially useful for Dr. Andersen. It has helped him identify patient-ventilator asynchrony and reduce over-sedation and over-assist.

The clinical experience of less sedation and more awake patients

Dr Andersen is able to communicate with his patients at almost any time. Watch the video and learn more about his work and what challenges he faced when lowering the sedation. From the science behind the decision to their clinical experience today.

Personalizing ventilation in the ICU

It can be challenging to identify how much ventilatory support the patient really needs. With Edi, the electrical activity of the diaphragm, you can identify and reduce over-sedation, over-assist, and asynchrony. This can help you start the weaning process earlier. [1] [2] [3]

Learn more about Personalized Ventilation

All references

  1. 1. Kallio M, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) in pediatric intensive care – a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2015 Jan;50(1):55-62.

  2. 2. Bellani G, Pesenti A. Assessing effort and work of breathing. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2014 Jun;20(3):352-8.

  3. 3. Ducharme-Crevier L, et al. Interest of Monitoring Diaphragmatic Electrical Activity in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Crit Care Res Pract. 2013;2013:384210