Select Your Country or Region
Continue
COVID-19 Resource Center

Servo-i Ventilator

Servo-i is discontinued - meet the Servo-u

Servo-i Ventilator

Servo-i has been discontinued in the US, but its proven legacy is carried forward in the next generation Servo-u and Servo-u MR (MR conditional) ventilators.

Servo-u is the next step forward in making protective ventilation more accessible, understandable and easy to implement.

Servo-u MR, designed for patient ventilation during MRI scanning, is an effective complement to other ventilators in the Servo family. The common interface saves training time and eases patient transitions.

Servo-u and Servo-u MR also share ventilation performance. This means that set and measured values are the same on both ventilators, making the transition of settings less complicated.

Servo-u MR Conditional Ventilator

Designed for safety. Crafted for you.

Ventilate all patient categories during MR scanning, from invasive and non-invasive ventilation to high-flow therapy.

 

Explore the Servo-u MR Conditional Ventilator

Overview

All references

  1. Yonis H, et al. Patient-ventilator synchrony in Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) and Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV). BMC Anesthesiol. 2015 Aug 8;15:117.

  2. Piquilloud L, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist improves patient-ventilator interaction. Intensive Care Med. 2011 Feb;37(2):263-71.

  3. Blankman P, et al. Ventilation distribution measured with EIT at varying levels of PS and NAVA in Patients with ALI. Intensive Care Med. 2013 Jun;39(6):1057-62.

  4. Patroniti N, et al. Respiratory pattern during neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in acute respiratory failure patients. Intensive Care Med. 2012 Feb;38(2):230-9.

  5. Kallio M, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) in pediatric intensive care – a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2015 Jan;50(1):55-62.

  6. Piastra M, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist vs pressure support ventilation in infants recovering from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome: nested study. J Crit Care. 2014 Apr;29(2):312.e1-5.

  7. De la Oliva P, et al. Asynchrony, neural drive, ventilatory variability and COMFORT: NAVA versus pressure support in pediatric patients. Intensive Care Med. 2012 May;38(5):838-46.

  8. Emeriaud G, et al. Evolution of inspiratory diaphragm activity in children over the course of the PICU stay. Intensive Care Med. 2014 Nov;40(11):1718-26.

  9. Bellani G, Pesenti A. Assessing effort and work of breathing. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2014 Jun;20(3):352-8.

  10. Barwing J, et al. Electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi) as a monitoring parameter in difficult weaning from respirator: a pilot study. Crit Care. 2013 Aug 28;17(4):R182.