Servo-i Ventilator

maquet servo-i product photo
product photo servo-i screen

Servo-i Ventilator

A wealth of features and functionalities for treating adult, pediatric and neonatal patients.

Overview

A single ventilator to  treat every patient, everywhere

Servo-i® ventilator delivers a high level of clinical performance for a variety of situations and for all patients. This helps clinicians provide cost-effective care throughout the hospital.

Personalized Ventilation

Servo ventilators equipped with NAVA® can display your patient's diaphragm activity on screen, so you can improve patient-ventilator synchrony and comfort. This can lead to reduced need for sedation, fewer complications and shorter weaning periods. [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

Read more about Personalized Ventilation

Features

A complete spectrum of treatment opportunities

Servo-i features all the modes you would expect from an advanced ventilation system in one adaptable platform. It also presents a wide range of tools to help you stabilize your patient and wean them off the ventilator.

Stress Index

Stress Index can help the clinician detect and prevent harmful ventilatory patterns, such as barotrauma, i.e. overdistension of the airways and lungs.

Open Lung Tool

The Open Lung Tool makes it easier to assess recruitment efficacy. On-screen values, such as dynamic compliance, assists you during lung recruitment and PEEP titration.

Heliox

Heliox minimizes turbulence and improves CO2 elimination. Easing the work of breathing for patients from neonate to adult. It can be used in all modes of ventilation.

Automode

Automode helps your patients' transition into spontaneous breathing with less need for staff intervention. It is an interactive mode that switches between controlled and supported ventilation conditional to patient effort.

On-screen diaphragm EMG

The electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) shows you the patient's breathing effort, breath by breath. It helps you titrate sedation and identify the best level of support at all times and during any mode of ventilation.

NAVA and NIV NAVA

Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) promotes lung protective spontaneous breathing with higher diaphragmatic efficiency, and fewer periods of over- and under-assist. This can help you reduce sedation with higher comfort scores and improved sleep quality.

MR Conditional

Servo-i MR provides continuity of care for critically ill patients throughout the MR process. Full trigger sensitivity and a range of ventilation options are available for use with all patient categories.

Training

Improve your knowledge by registering for our free accredited live training courses.

ABCs of Ventilator Modes

Why Ventilator Modes and Settings Matter Web Seminar

This live, one-hour presentation will help you differentiate between invasive and noninvasive ventilation and understand the common modes and settings for each with a particular focus on ventilator-associated clinical challenges, including diaphragm muscle atrophy.

This program has been approved for a maximum of 1.0 contact hour Continuing Respiratory Care Education (CRCE) credit by the American Association for Respiratory Care. Course 150529000

This program has been approved by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) for 1.0 CERP, Synergy CERP Category A. File Number 22346

Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA®)

Ventilator/Patient Synchrony Redefined Web Seminar

This live, one hour, accredited web seminar will outline information on the fundamental physiologic background  of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) technology. Provides instruction regarding the correct selection of the Edi catheter and using the Edi signal as a patient-monitoring tool. Also presents patient case examples utilizing the Edi signal, during various stages of ventilatory support, and using NAVA ventilation.

This program has been approved for a maximum of 1.0 contact hour Continuing Respiratory Care Education (CRCE) credit by the American Association for Respiratory Care. Course 143733000

This program has been approved by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) for 1.0 CERP, Synergy CERP Category A. File Number 19379

Implementing NAVA for Adult Patients

Case Studies and General Discussions

This 1 hour, live web seminar will provide a brief overview of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) technology and focus on its application in adults with compromised respiratory systems using a case study approach.

Presented will be adult NAVA case studies conducted at the University of Missouri. At the conclusion of the presentation, an interactive Q&A session will enable participants to interact with the presenter to discuss NAVA best practices.

This program has been approved for a maximum of 1.0 contact hour Continuing Respiratory Care Education (CRCE) credit by the American Association for Respiratory Care. Course #18016200.

All references

  1. 1. Yonis H, et al. Patient-ventilator synchrony in Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) and Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV). BMC Anesthesiol. 2015 Aug 8;15:117.

  2. 2. Piquilloud L, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist improves patient-ventilator interaction. Intensive Care Med. 2011 Feb;37(2):263-71.

  3. 3. Blankman P, et al. Ventilation distribution measured with EIT at varying levels of PS and NAVA in Patients with ALI. Intensive Care Med. 2013 Jun;39(6):1057-62.

  4. 4. Patroniti N, et al. Respiratory pattern during neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in acute respiratory failure patients. Intensive Care Med. 2012 Feb;38(2):230-9.

  5. 5. Kallio M, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) in pediatric intensive care – a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2015 Jan;50(1):55-62.

  6. 6. Piastra M, et al. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist vs pressure support ventilation in infants recovering from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome: nested study. J Crit Care. 2014 Apr;29(2):312.e1-5.

  7. 7. De la Oliva P, et al. Asynchrony, neural drive, ventilatory variability and COMFORT: NAVA versus pressure support in pediatric patients. Intensive Care Med. 2012 May;38(5):838-46.

  8. 8. Emeriaud G, et al. Evolution of inspiratory diaphragm activity in children over the course of the PICU stay. Intensive Care Med. 2014 Nov;40(11):1718-26.

  9. 9. Bellani G, Pesenti A. Assessing effort and work of breathing. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2014 Jun;20(3):352-8.

  10. 10. Barwing J, et al. Electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi) as a monitoring parameter in difficult weaning from respirator: a pilot study. Crit Care. 2013 Aug 28;17(4):R182.